Who We Are

The Conservation Trust for Florida was founded in 1999 as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit land trust. The mission of the Conservation Trust for Florida is to work with landowners to save Florida’s wild and working landscapes for future generations. To date, we have worked with private landowners, governmental agencies, and partnering nonprofits to protect over 19,000 acres.

With a reputation for reliability, consistency and longevity, we continue to build on our foundation of relationships with private landowners in rural communities and strong partnerships with agencies and nonprofit organizations.

The Conservation Trust for Florida has had an excellent track record of success working within lean budgets. We are run by a small staff of professionals and a dedicated, hard-working board of volunteer directors. Because we keep administration costs low, more of your donation goes toward conservation projects. Our vision is large-scale, and we are 100% committed to conservation in the state of Florida.

wekiva-little-blue-hemlock

Little blue heron rises from wild hemlock on the Wekiva. Photo ©johnmoranphoto.com

In a Nutshell

  • We value Florida’s rural landscapes.
  • We work to protect networks of land, like the Florida Wildlife Corridor, that will ensure the survival of wildlife, health of natural systems, vitality of rural economies and preservation of outdoor recreational areas and heritage sites.
  • We want to make sure these lands are protected for current and future generations so we may all enjoy the benefits of nature and appreciate nature as part of our quality of life.
  • We understand the political and economic complexities saving land requires.
  • We value cooperation and partnerships.

About the Land Trust

LTAC_seal_greenLand Trusts are private, nonprofit organizations that work to conserve land for its natural, recreational, scenic, historical, and productive values. A land trust works with willing landowners and the community to protect these special places.

The Conservation Trust for Florida is one of only four Florida-based land trusts accredited by the Land Trust Accreditation Commission. Accredited land trusts meet rigorous national quality standards for protecting important natural places and working lands forever.

Our History Drives Us

Since our formation in 1999, we have earned a reputation of integrity within Florida’s environmental community and have become one of only four Florida land trusts accredited by the prestigious Land Trust Accreditation Commission. We have a strong history of tested policies, structure, processes, and procedures. We use a variety of tools, including conservation easements, to allow landowners to protect their lands long after they are gone.

We have always maintained a vision of land protection on a statewide basis, with the clear understanding that environmental ecology cuts across political and property boundaries. With your support and the dedication of our volunteers and staff, we are uniquely positioned to protect thriving working landscapes, vast wilderness areas, abundant clean water, and ample wildlife habitat from the Everglades to the Panhandle — for nature, for people, forever.

Partnerships make the work possible.

We can’t do this work alone. Large-scale land conservation projects are often made possible thanks to the efforts of many groups and individuals working together. The Conservation Trust for Florida continues to build relationships with private landowners in rural communities and maintains strong partnerships with government agencies, businesses, and nonprofit organizations.

We work to protect networks of land, like the Florida Wildlife Corridor, that will ensure the survival of wildlife, health of natural systems, vitality of rural economies, and preservation of outdoor recreational areas and heritage sites.

The Conservation Trust for Florida provides expertise to landowners and government agencies on a full range of land protection options, from conservation easements to land acquisitions.

Contributions to the Conservation Trust for Florida are leveraged with funds from private and public granting organizations, as well as with funds from state, local, and federal conservation programs.